Explore the Natural Wonders of Nahanni National Park

Nahanni National Park Reserve/ Naha Dehe is an outstanding example of northern adventure rivers, vast canyons, sheer granite spires and vast alpine plateaus. Dall’s sheep, mountain goats, woodland caribou, wolves, black bears, grizzlies and trumpeter swans all find refuge in Nahanni. The park, with a total area of 30,000 square km, is centred on the valleys of the South Nahanni and Flat Rivers. Nahanni includes the labyrinths of Nahanni Karst, the Ram Plateau, the Ragged Range of mountains and Glacier Lake. Climbers, hikers and paddlers are welcomed each summer by the Dehcho First Nations, whose ancestors called Naha Dehe home. 

Most visitors access the park by air charter from Fort Simpson, the park headquarters, located 145 km from the park's southeast boundary. Flightseeing tours and expedition outfitting are based here. One spectacular highlight of a flight or a paddling trip is Virginia Falls (Nailicho) on the South Nahanni River. This magnificent waterfall is twice the height of Niagara. There's a well maintained portage around the falls, and day trippers can land here to view the scenery. 

Paddling Naha Dehe

The South Nahanni River flows 563 km through scenic mountain valleys and a series of canyons before it reaches the Liard River at Nahanni Butte. This is the route some 600 river travellers take each year. On the upper reaches of the river, at Rabbitkettle Hotsprings, the largest Tufa Mounds in Canada can be seen. Created by warm mineral springs bubbling to the surface, tufa hardens to form intricate terraces and basins. These Tufa Mounds have special preservation status for their national cultural and natural significance. Visitors to the Tufa Mounds must be accompanied by National Park Reserve staff.

Nahanni National Park Reserve was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1978. The South Nahanni River was named a Canadian Heritage River in 1987.

For information, contact: www/pc.gc.ca/nahanni, email: nahanni.info@pc.gc.ca, phone: 867-695-3151.

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