Discover the secret that soars our skies

Discover the secret that soars our skies
Lean in close. We have a secret to share.
It's about the gleam you'll see in the Northern sky, and the hum that comes echoing down the canyon.
It's about a wing dipping to wave hello. A silky-smooth touchdown on the broad river. A can-do frontier spirit, flying free. 
It's about the journey that's also the arrival -- the vehicle of dreams. 
So if you promise not to tell, we'll let you in on our secret. Here's 10 soaring secrets about the bush planes of the Northwest Territories:
secret 1

The Northwest Territories is a flightseeing paradise. From here, aerial tours glide off in all directions, with stunning landmarks and wild beasts providing a spectacle from above. Buzz over the glorious East Arm of Great Slave Lake, gaze upon galloping herds of bison in Wood Buffalo National Park, ogle the stately peaks of the Mackenzie Range, or soar over the unpeopled Barrens where caribou rule the land.

secret 2

Where the road ends, life begins – and bush planes are how you get there. Hop a “flying taxi” to one of our wonderful naturalist lodges, fishing camps, national parks, wilderness rivers or other remote oases. 

secret 3

Flying in a small plane is cool. Landing on water? Even cooler. If we could pick just one vehicle to use for the rest of our life, it would be a floatplane. If you’ve never been in one, this is the place to have your first floatplane experience.

secret 4

Runways? We don't need no stinkin' runways! Just strap a set of skis on a Twin Otter and you've got the ultimate go-anywhere flying machine. Ski planes are ubiquitous in the Northwest Territories. You can charter one to take a sightseeing tour, skimming low over our winter wonderland. Ski planes are also a great way to get out to Aurora-viewing lodges. So buckle up and prepare to catch some air.

secret 5

Wanna keep your feet on the ground? You can still revel in the remarkable history of Northern flying. Several of our museums showcase the bush planes of the Northwest Territories, including the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre in Yellowknife, the Norman Wells Historical Centre, and the Historical Aviation Museum, also in Norman Wells.  

secret 6

Speaking of spots that honour aviation, no trip to the Northwest Territories is complete without a pilgrimage up the stairs to Yellowknife’s Bush Pilots’ Monument. Perched atop “The Rock,” this landmark is a memorial to frontier flyers who lost their lives in the Northern sky. It’s also the best lookout in town, with views over Houseboat Bay, Back Bay and Old Town

Secret 7

Fly with a real live bush pilot – like Fort Simpson's legendary Ted Grant, who’s been soaring over the canyons of the Nahanni for decades, ferrying paddlers to their put-ins, climbers to the high country, and sightseers to famous Virginia Falls.

Secret 8

… or with Hay River's maverick “Buffalo Joe” McBryan, whose iconic Buffalo Airways flies DC-3s that saw service in World War II, and which star in the wildly popular reality TV-show Ice Pilots NWT. 

Secret 9

Experience that feeling when you wave goodbye to the bush plane and you realize you're all alone. It's like the weight of the modern world lifts from your shoulders, setting you truly free. 

Secret 10

If you like to soar the Northern skies, you’d be crazy to miss the bi-annual Midnight Sun Float Plane Fly-In. Taking place in Yellowknife for four days in July, the event welcomes flyboys (and girls) from around the world, who wing their way here for a celebration of aerial culture.

Want to discover more secrets of the Northwest Territories? Enter now and win!

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Ahmic Air Ltd.

Floatplane charter service using classic DHC-2 Beaver aircraft based in Yellowknife's historic Old Town. Sightseeing flights over Yellowknife and surrounding areas, day trips, and transportation to remote camps,... Read more

North-Wright Airways Ltd.

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Hoarfrost River Huskies Ltd.

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Ram Head Outfitters Ltd.

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Reliance Airways Ltd

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South Nahanni Outfitters Ltd.

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Tundra North Tours Ltd.

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Northwestern Air Lease Ltd.

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Simpson Air

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Arctic Adventure Tours & Arctic Chalet

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Air Tindi

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Gwich'in Helicopters Ltd.

Helicopter charters out of Inuvik to locations throughout the Mackenzie Delta, including Tuktoyaktuk. Read more

Aklak Air

Scheduled air transportation to Paulatuk, Tuktoyaktuk, Sachs Harbour, Ulukhaktok and seasonally to Fort McPherson out of Inuvik and air charter service to anywhere in the Western Arctic. Read more

Adlair Aviation

Charter service available throughout NWT & Nunavut, with bases of operation in Yellowknife & Cambridge Bay. Read more

South Nahanni Airways

Charters to Nahanni National Park, Twin Otter in wheels, floats, and skies. Read more

Summit Air

Summit Air is a specialized charter aviation company with a keen focus on customer service and customized aviation solutions. Read more

Ursus Aviation

A native owned company with over 30 years operating experience. Serving the Sahtu and Yellowknife areas including Tulita, Norman Wells, Wrigley, Deline, Fort Good Hope and Colville Lake. Wheels, skis and floats. On- and... Read more

Wolverine Air (1988) Ltd.

Air charter service based in Fort Simpson, operating year-round service since 1972. Wheels, skis, floats. Nahanni National Park Reserve specialist. Flightseeing and self-guided canoeing, hiking and fishing trips. Read more