Gamètì

Gamètı̀

“Rabbit-net place”

Population: 296

This placid town got its start in the 1970s when Tłįchǫ Dene founded a traditional settlement on the point between Rae Lake and Lac Ste. Croix, halfway between Great Bear and Great Slave. In summer it’s typically reached by plane from Yellowknife, while in winter it’s an adventurous 213-kilometre trip via ice road. Grayling fishing, lake tours, and local crafts await visitors. Intrepid wilderness paddlers sometimes set out from here en route to Behchokǫ̀ on the Marian Lakes/Camsell River route.

Location: 64°07′ N, 117°21′ W
Elevation: 220 metres
Population: 311
Name means: “Rabbit-net place”
Former name: Rae Lakes (changed in 2005)
Record high / low: 32.6°C / -51.5°C
Setting: On a forested peninsula jutting into Rae Lake, approximately halfway between Great Slave Lake and Great Bear Lake
Languages: Tłı̨chǫ Yatıì, English
Ethnicities: Dene (Tłı̨chǫ)
Getting here: By air from Yellowknife, or by winter road from Behchokǫ̀
Founded in: This site is on the ancestral territory of the Tłı̨chǫ Dene, and served for eons as a seasonal hunting and fishing camp. Modern infrastructure arrived in 1972 with the construction of an airstrip, school and store
Best expedition: Paddling the “Idaa Trail,” a series of lakes and rivers linking Gamètı̀ with Great Slave Lake
 

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