The Dempster Highway serves as a boundary for this 8,800-hectare park, which includes two campgrounds (Vadzaih Van Tshik Campground and Gwich’in Territorial Campground), two day-use areas (Ehjuu NJik and Nihtak) and Tithegeh Chii Vitaii Lookout. The park is home to a number of natural wonders of the Mackenzie Delta region: limestone cliffs, rare Arctic plant communities, migratory bird staging areas, and Campbell Lake, an excellent example of a reversing delta.

Just outside Inuvik, this park features an observation tower with excellent views of the surrounding scenery and prime bird-watching. Watch for falcons, eagles and ducks, our summer residents. There is an abundance of cranberries, blueberries and cloudberries that give the park its name. The campground offers six powered and 32 non-powered sites, washrooms and showers, drinking water, a kitchen shelter and picnic area, trails, interpretive displays and helpful staff. 

The largest developed park on the Ingraham Trail, Prelude Lake Territorial Park offers a variety of facilities. There are trails,a sandy beach for swimming, a dock and boat launch, and boat rentals. The island-filled lake, about 16 kilometers long, forms part of the Cameron River system and has excellent Trout and Pike fishing. At the scenic campground you'll find 32 non-powered sites and 12 tent pads, plus washrooms, drinking water, firewood, kitchen shelters and picnic areas, and a playground. 

Make the trip to see the falls, even if you do not plan to camp overnight. From the Mackenzie Highway, an access road leads 6.8 kilometres south to the park. From the parking lot, a short trail leads to Lady Evelyn Falls. The falls form a giant curtain of water as the Kakisa River spills over a limestone escarpment. A staircase leads into the gorge at the base of the falls. The Kakisa River is a warm and boulder-strewn river with many lovely spots for wading and swimming.

A must-see attraction on highway 1 from Fort Providence to Fort Simpson, the Sambaa Deh Gorge gapes where the Trout River slices through thick spruce woodlands not far from the community of Jean Marie River. Most visitors photograph the roadside falls, where the river surges through a limestone slot  and hurtles over a preciptious drop – but there's plenty more to see if you follow the network of trails that trace the canyon rim.

Following the rim of the gorgeous Hay River canyon, the easy Twin Falls Gorge trail begins at the community of Enterprise and leads south for eight kilometres through luxuriant boreal forest. Along the way you'll enjoy interpretive signage, great views of the yawning limestone chasm, and the marvels of Twin Falls Gorge Territorial Park, which include Louise Falls (you can get down to the lip of the cascade via a dizzying spiral staircase) and mammoth Alexandra Falls, where the trail terminates. 

Forming a seven-kilometre loop around the shores of Frame Lake in the heart of Yellowknife, the city's favourite walking trail has a little of everything. The eastern half of the loop is a paved, sedate urban path, leading you past architectural marvels such as the territorial legislative assembly, city hall and the famous Prince of Wales museum.

Erupting from the pancake-flat tundra just outside the community of Tuktoyaktuk, this bulbous, ice-filled mound is the second-largest "pingo" on Earth. Called Ibyuk, it's 1,000 feet wide at its base and rises to the height of a 15-storey building, making its summit a scenic and popular destination for hikers.

A four-kilometre dayhike downriver from Alexandra Falls or upriver from Enterprise, this tiered, 15-metre-high cataract in the Hay River Canyon can be viewed from one of the finest (and most popular) campgrounds in the Northwest Territories. 

Get our Free Explorers' Guide

Is the Northwest Territories on your must-see list? Order or download our free Explorers' Guide to plan your trip of a lifetime.