Due to COVID-19 (Coronavirus) the NWT borders are closed to all non-essential travel. For more information, see border information from the Government of the Northwest Territories at:
https://www.gov.nt.ca/covid-19/en/services/travel-moving-around/nwt-border-information.

The largest developed park on the Ingraham Trail, Prelude Lake Territorial Park offers a variety of facilities. There are trails,a sandy beach for swimming, a dock and boat launch, and boat rentals. The island-filled lake, about 16 kilometers long, forms part of the Cameron River system and has excellent Trout and Pike fishing. At the scenic campground you'll find 32 non-powered sites and 12 tent pads, plus washrooms, drinking water, firewood, kitchen shelters and picnic areas, and a playground.

 

Swim at Long Lake’s sandy beach. Camp, picnic, canoe or enjoy the amenities and attractions of nearby Yellowknife. Hike the four-kilometre Prospector’s Trail, highlighting the gold-bearing geology of the area. Or follow the Jackfish and Frame Lake trail system, leading you through through the idyllic shield-country wilderness en route to downtown Yellowknife. The Fred Henne campground offers 62 powered sites, 39 non-powered sites and 12 tent pads, plus washrooms and showers, drinking water, firewood, kitchen shalters and picnic areas, a boat launch, and helpful staff.

 

On the shores of Frame Lake in front of City Hall, this grassy park is Yellowknife's favourite gathering place. In summer, musical performances are common at the waterfront ampitheatre, and various attractions – the museum, the visitor centre, Firewood Studio, a towering drum-dance sculpture, etc. – are close by. 

Yellowknife's most popular lookout rises above Old Town, providing a stupendous view over Great Slave Lake, Back Bay and the northern reaches of the city. The monument is high up on "The Rock," and is accessed via a winding staircase to the top. It is dedicated to the bush pilots and engineers whose lives were lost as they flew the wilderness skies of the Northwest Territories. The monument also serves a practical purpose: When the light atop the tower is flashing, residents and visitors are warned that floatplanes or skiplanes are active on nearby Yellowknife Bay.

Direclty across HIghway 3 from the Northern Frontier Visitor Centre, this easy two-kilometre loop explores the shoreline of a small marshy lake in the heart of a Yellowknife residential neighbourhood. Despite its urban location, Niven Lake is rich in wildlife, with beavers, muskrats and waterfowl a common sight. The trail features benches, viewing platforms and interpretive signage.   

Perched on a pillar near the entrance to town, the yellow and blue Bristol Freighter airplane greets visitors to Yellowknife, reminding them of the region's vital aviation history. Bush planes such as this one fed the development of the town, bringing people and supplies before Yellowknife was connected to the outside world by road. The Bristol Freighter itself was the first wheeled plane to touch down at the North Pole before being retired in 1968. Around the freighter you'll find trails, picnic tables and interpretive signage. 

Located at 7 Otto Drive on Latham Island, this log cabin is one of Yellowknife's oldest surviving buildings. Built in 1938 as a private residence, the city's Bank of Toronto branch opened here six years later. Allan Lambert, former president and chairman of the Toronto Dominion Bank, cut his teeth as branch manager here. In 1961, the bank outgrew this small building and relocated its commercial operations. Today it is once again a private residence.  

Built in 1946 on the waterfront in Old Town, this City of Yellowknife Heritage Site was the city's first permanent floatplane base. Many aviation pioneers once worked out of this building, including Stan McMillan and Max Ward. In earlier years, the large hall was also used for social gatherings such as the Fireman's Ball, hockey banquets, and New Year's Eve parties. 

Built in the early 1930s as a blacksmith shop, this single-storey log building was originally situated on what is now the Giant Mine property. After being moved to its current location near City Hall it became a tourist information centre (1978-1992), and, now, an artist's studio and retail outlet.

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